SYNOPSIS

torf PATH [OPTIONS] [-o TORRENT]
torf -i INPUT
torf -i INPUT [OPTIONS] -o TORRENT
torf -i TORRENT PATH

DESCRIPTION

torf can create, display and edit torrent files and verify the integrity of a torrent’s content.

  • torf PATH [OPTIONS] [-o TORRENT]
    Create the torrent file TORRENT from the file or directory PATH.

  • torf -i INPUT
    Display information stored in the torrent file or magnet URI INPUT.

  • torf -i INPUT [OPTIONS] -o TORRENT
    Edit the existing torrent file or magnet URI INPUT (e.g. to fix a typo) and create the new torrent file TORRENT.

    Warning
    Editing a torrent can change its hash, depending on what is changed, which essentially makes it a new torrent. See OPTIONS to find out whether a certain option will change the hash.
  • torf -i TORRENT PATH
    Verify that the content in PATH matches the metadata in the torrent file TORRENT.

    If PATH ends with a path separator (e.g. "/"), the name of the torrent (as specified in TORRENT) is appended.

OPTIONS

Options that start with --no take precedence.

PATH

The path to the torrent’s content.

When verifying data, the torrent’s name is appended.

--exclude, -e PATTERN

Exclude files from PATH that match the glob pattern PATTERN. This option may be given multiple times. See EXCLUDING FILES.

--exclude-regex, -er PATTERN

Exclude files from PATH that match the regular expression PATTERN. This option may be given multiple times. See EXCLUDING FILES.

--include PATTERN

Include files from PATH that match the glob pattern PATTERN even if they match any --exclude or --exclude-regex patterns. This option may be given multiple times. See EXCLUDING FILES.

--include-regex, -ir PATTERN

Include files from PATH that match the regular expression PATTERN even if they match any --exclude or --exclude-regex patterns. This option may be given multiple times. See EXCLUDING FILES.

--in, -i INPUT

Read metainfo from the torrent file or magnet URI INPUT. If INPUT is "-" and does not exist, the torrent data or magnet URI is read from stdin.

--out, -o TORRENT

Write to torrent file TORRENT.
Default: NAME.torrent

--notorrent, -N

Do not create a torrent file.

--nomagnet, -M

Do not create a magnet URI.

--name, -n NAME

Destination file or directory when the torrent is downloaded.
Default: Basename of PATH

Warning
When editing, this option changes the info hash and creates a new torrent.
--tracker, -t URL

List of comma-separated announce URLs. This option may be given multiple times for multiple tiers. Clients try all URLs from one tier in random order before moving on to the next tier.

--notracker, -T

Remove trackers from an existing torrent.

--webseed, -w URL

A webseed URL (BEP19). This option may be given multiple times.

--nowebseed, -W

Remove webseeds from an existing torrent.

--private, -p

Tell clients to use tracker(s) exclusively for peer discovery.

Warning
When editing, this option changes the info hash and creates a new torrent.
--noprivate, -P

Allow clients to use DHT and PEX for peer discovery.

Warning
When editing, this option changes the info hash and creates a new torrent.
--comment, -c COMMENT

A comment that is stored in the torrent file.

--nocomment, -C

Remove the comment from an existing torrent.

--date, -d DATE

The creation date in the format YYYY-MM-DD[ HH:MM[:SS]], now for the current time or today for today at midnight.
Default: now

--nodate, -D

Remove the creation date from an existing torrent.

--source, -s SOURCE

Add a “source” field to the torrent file. This is usually used to make the torrent’s info hash unique per tracker.

Warning
When editing, this option changes the info hash and creates a new torrent.
--nosource, -S

Remove the “source” field from an existing torrent.

Warning
When editing, this option changes the info hash and creates a new torrent.
--xseed, -x

Randomize the info hash to help with cross-seeding. This simply adds an entropy field to the info section of the metainfo and sets it to a random integer.

Warning
When editing, this option changes the info hash and creates a new torrent.
--noxseed, -X

De-randomize a previously randomized info hash of an existing torrent. This removes the entropy field from the info section of the metainfo.

Warning
When editing, this option changes the info hash and creates a new torrent.
--max-piece-size SIZE

The maximum piece size when creating a torrent. SIZE is multiplied by 1 MiB (1048576 bytes). The resulting number must be a power of two (2, 4, 8, 16, etc.). Numbers smaller than 1 are allowed, e.g. “0.25” sets the maximum piece size to 256 KiB.

--nocreator, -R

Remove the name of the application that created the torrent from an existing torrent.

--yes, -y

Answer all yes/no prompts with “yes”. At the moment, all this does is overwrite TORRENT without asking.

--config, -f FILE

Read command line arguments from configuration FILE. See CONFIGURATION FILE.
Default: $XDG_CONFIG_HOME/torf/config where $XDG_CONFIG_HOME defaults to ~/.config

--noconfig, -F

Do not use any configuration file.

--profile, -z PROFILE

Use predefined arguments specified in PROFILE. This option may be given multiple times. See CONFIGURATION FILE.

--verbose, -v

Produce more output or be more thorough. This option may be given multiple times.

  • Display bytes with and without unit prefix, e.g. "1.38 MiB / 1,448,576 B".

  • When verifying, corrupt files are always read to the end instead of skipping them after the first corrupt piece.

  • Any other effects are explained in the relevant arguments' documentation.

--json, -j

Print information and errors as a JSON object. Progress is not reported.

--metainfo, -m

Print the torrent’s metainfo as a JSON object. Byte strings (e.g. "pieces" in the "info" section) are encoded in Base64. Progress is not reported. Errors are reported normally on stderr.

Unless --verbose is given, any non-standard fields are excluded and metainfo that doesn’t represent a valid torrent results in an error. Unless --verbose is given twice, the "pieces" field in the "info" section is excluded.

--human, -u

Display information in human-readable output even if stdout is not a TTY. See PIPING OUTPUT.

--nohuman, -U

Display information in machine-readable output even if stdout is a TTY. See PIPING OUTPUT.

--help, -h

Display a short help text and exit.

--version, -V

Display the version number and exit.

EXAMPLES

Create “foo.torrent” with two trackers and don’t store the creation date:

$ torf path/to/foo \
       -t http://example.org:6881/announce \
       -t http://example.com:6881/announce \
       --nodate

Read “foo.torrent” and print its metainfo:

$ torf -i foo.torrent

Print only the name:

$ torf -i foo.torrent | grep '^Name' | cut -f2

Change the comment and remove the date from “foo.torrent”, write the result to “bar.torrent”:

$ torf -i foo.torrent -c 'New comment' -D -o bar.torrent

Check if “path/to/foo” contains valid data as specified in “bar.torrent”:

$ torf -i bar.torrent path/to/foo

EXCLUDING FILES

The --exclude option takes a glob pattern that is matched against each file path beneath PATH. Files that match are not included in the torrent. Matching is case-insensitive.

The --exclude-regex option works like --exclude but it takes a regular expression pattern and it does case-sensitive matching.

The --include and --include-regex options are applied like their excluding counterparts, but any matching files are included even if they match any exclude patterns.

File paths start with the torrent’s name (usually the last segment of PATH), e.g. if PATH is “/home/foo/bar”, each file path starts with “bar/”

Empty directories and empty files are automatically excluded.

Regular expressions should be Perl-compatible for simple patterns. See https://docs.python.org/3/library/re.html#regular-expression-syntax for the complete documentation.

Glob patterns support these wildcard characters:

*

matches everything

?

matches any single character

[SEQ]

matches any character in SEQ

[!SEQ]

matches any character not in SEQ

CONFIGURATION FILE

A configuration file lists long-form command line options with all leading “-” characters removed. If an option takes a parameter, “=” is used as a separator. Spaces before and after the “=” are ignored. The parameter may be quoted with single or double quotes to preserve leading and/or trailing spaces. Lines that start with “#” are ignored.

All of the options listed in the OPTIONS section are allowed except for PATH, in, out, name, config, noconfig, profile, help, version.

There is rudimental support for environment variables in parameters. As usual, “$FOO” or “${FOO}” will be replaced with the value of the variable FOO, “$” is escaped with “\” (backslash) and a literal “\” is represented by two “\”. More complex string manipulation syntax (e.g. “${FOO:3}”) is not supported.

Profiles

A profile is a set of options bound to a name that is given to the --profile option. In the configuration file it is specified as “[PROFILE NAME]” followed by a list of options. Profiles inherit any options specified globally at the top of the file, but they can overload them.

Example

This is an example configuration file with some global custom defaults and the two profiles “foo” and “bar”:

yes
nodate
exclude = *.txt

[foo]
tracker = https://foo1/announce
tracker = https://foo2/announce
private

[bar]
tracker = https://bar/announce
comment = I love bar.

With this configuration file, these arguments are always used:

--yes
--nodate
--exclude '*.txt'

If “--profile foo” is given, it also adds these arguments:

--tracker https://foo1/announce
--tracker https://foo2/announce
--private

If “--profile bar” is given, it also adds these arguments:

--tracker https://bar/announce
--comment 'I love bar.'

PIPING OUTPUT

If stdout is not a TTY (i.e. when output is piped) or if the --nohuman option is provided, the output format is different:

  • Leading spaces are removed from each line.

  • The delimiter between label and value as well as between multiple values (files, trackers, etc) is a tab character (“\t” or ASCII code 0x9). Trackers are flattened into a one-dimensional list.

  • Numbers are not formatted (UNIX timestamps for times, seconds for time deltas, raw bytes for sizes, etc).

EXIT CODES

1

Anything not specified below

2

Unknown or invalid command line arguments

3

Error while reading or parsing the config file

4

Error while reading a torrent file or content

5

Error while writing a torrent file

6

Error while verifying a torrent’s content

128

Aborted by SIGINT (typically Ctrl-c was pressed)

REPORTING BUGS

Bug reports, feature requests and poems about hedgehogs are welcome on the issue tracker.